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Practical Applications of Active Learning

We complain that students don’t come to class anymore. Our students complain that attending lectures is not a productive use of their time. Our accreditation bodies stress the importance of active learning and ensuring that our students become life-long learners. Educational experts have told us that a lecture by a “sage on the stage” is neither active learning nor good pedagogy. At our conferences and through the media we hear about colleagues that use flipped classrooms to promote active learning and increase student performance and attendance.  

We have heard the hype, but what is the reality? We are now beginning to explore, at different levels of application, subtle and major differences in approaches to active and engaged learning.

This webcast series will provide a framework for understanding and distinguishing between the various definitions and perspectives on active and engaged learning and will detail specific practical applications in the modern classroom. 

Our first session will explore the definitions of active and engaged learning from the perspectives of one of our accrediting bodies and the faculty. The Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) accredits, North American allopathic medical schools and “active learning” is a specific LCME accreditation standard (ED-5-A). The second perspective is the faculty member facing the reality of satisfying ED-5-A while balancing the realities of decreased teaching time, sparse classroom lecture attendance, and the uncertainty of the impact of these changes on student outcomes. In this example, ED-5-A changes the role of a faculty member from content provider to synthesizer and facilitator. Lessons learned from trying to understand and comply with this accreditation standard in medical education have practical applications to all health professions as active and engaged learning gets more and more attention.

We follow with the challenges that face faculty and students as they engage in active learning. A subsequent session will present faculty experiences and lessons learned on getting started “from scratch” on these initiatives. Our following three sessions will focus on specific curricula and approaches for flipping the classroom (without flopping!), application of active learning approaches to large classrooms, and advantages and disadvantages of massive open online courses (MOOCs) in health science education. 

 


 
Jan 9 12:00 pm ET How Medical Schools Operationalize LCME Accreditation Expectations for Self-Directed and Active Learning
George Dambach and Donna Waechter
Jan 16 12:00 pm ET Approaches to Active Learning; Two Medical Schools Make a Start

Michael Parmely and Susan Ely
Jan 23 12:00 pm ET A Pedagogically Driven Redesign to Fulfill Medical Education's Social Contract

Catherine Lucey
Jan 30 12:00 pm ET Practical Tips for Active Learning in Large Scale Classrooms

Kathryn Huggett and William Jeffries

Feb 6 12:00 pm ET MOOCS and Health Sciences Education: Hype or Disruption?

Natalie Lafferty


How Medical Schools Operationalize LCME Accreditation Expectations for Self-Directed and Active Learning

Presenter: George Dambach and Donna Waechter

The current definitions of active vs. engaged learning from the perspective of the LCME will be presented by Dr. Waechter. Examples of how LCME expectations are operationalized by several medical schools will be presented by Dr. Dambach. The webinar will include a question and answer segment for participants.

bulletDownload the Presentation Slides Here

bulletDownload the Presentation Handout Here






Approaches to Active Learning; Two Medical Schools Make a Start

Presenter: Michael Parmely and Susan Ely

This session outlines experiences at two medical schools currently introducing student-centered active learning in lieu of traditional didactic methods.

Since 2010 the University of Kansas Medical Center has been developing a program designed to augment student problem-solving skills with an emphasis on case-based classroom analysis and discussion. In 2013, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine began providing pre-recorded curricular content as a foundation for classroom synthesis sessions in which instructors asked students to expand on and integrate information in the context of clinical scenarios.

An essential component of these programs at both institutions is the emphasis on student-identified learning objectives. Both presenters will highlight challenges and successes encountered as each school travels towards more engaged student-directed learning.

 

bulletDownload the Presentation Slides Here

bulletDownload the Presentation Handout Here




A Pedagogically Driven Redesign to Fulfill Medical Education's Social Contract

Presenter: Catherine Lucey

There has been a growing recognition that our health care system is struggling. Despite spending over $2.5 trillion per year on health care, the US still ranks 16th amongst 17 peer countries in health outcomes. Medical education and medical educators must collaborate with clinical and research experts to better prepare our physicians to be a part of the solution.
 
This presentation will describe the origin of and strategies for implementing  the UCSF Bridges Curriculum. Our overarching goal is to train physician leaders who continue to excel as researchers and clinicians as well as understand and improve the complex system in which they work. Our curriculum will prepare students to 1) Collaborate more effectively; 2) Innovate within complex systems; and 3) Create new models of care to take our health system to the next level.
 
To do this, the Bridges curriculum will provide authentic workplace learning experiences that leverage the talents and commitment of our students to improve health today while sustaining these skills in future practice.

Objectives:

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Outline the differences between pedagogical and design based curriculum redesign strategies.

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Contrast the different knowledge and skills needed by successful physicians in the 21st century with those needed in the 20th century.

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Apply principles of authentic workplace learning and communities of practice to an outcomes based curriculum redesign project.

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Consider how technology can facilitate this transformation

 

bulletDownload the Presentation Slides Here

bulletDownload the Presentation Handout Here






Practical Tips for Active Learning in Large Scale Classrooms

Presenter: Kathryn Huggett and William Jeffries

The one hour lecture remains the traditional unit of medical education, particularly for the foundational sciences. A number of factors contribute to the preeminence of the lecture: it is an efficient way to accomplish the goal of knowledge transfer to the student, it is the easiest and most familiar format for students and faculty, and is the most economically feasible mechanism for the college to accomplish its teaching goals. However, it is generally agreed that most lectures limit engagement and therefore promote only "passive" learning and do not promote long-term retention. Medical educators have thus been investigating techniques to promote active learning, which promotes longer term retention and deeper understanding of scientific concepts. In active learning, the student often participates as a partner in the teaching and learning of the group as a whole.

A variety of active learning techniques have emerged as a way to expand the boundaries of learning within the confines of the traditional large group setting.

In this IAMSE web audio seminar we will discuss the learning principles behind active learning and reasons for incorporating these concepts in their large group teaching. The session will then demonstrate environmental and psychological factors that influence learning and enable participants to develop techniques to use these factors to increase learning and retention. Finally, classroom techniques that can increase engagement, learning and retention in both traditional lecture and flipped settings will be discussed.

bulletDownload the Presentation Slides Here

bulletDownload the Presentation Handout Here

bulletDownload the Extra Presentation Resource File Here




MOOCS and Health Sciences Education: Hype or Disruption?

Presenter: Natalie Lafferty

In educational circles 2013 was labelled the year of the MOOC - the massive open online course. It was the year that MOOCs were set to go main stream and Udacity, Coursera and edX were constantly in the news attracting ever higher numbers of students on to their courses. MOOCS were going to disrupt education, there was talk of only 10 universities existing in 50 year' time and academics, including in the health sciences, became concerned about the potential for their departments to close and in turn lose their jobs. By the end of the year however, the positivity around MOOCs was beginning to wane. Column inches turned to news of low completion rates, poor pedagogy and MOOCs nearing the peak of the hype cycle.

This presentation will explore the evolution of MOOCs and the role they might play in the future of health science education. Do they have the potential to disrupt or are we just witnessing hype at play? We will look at the different approaches to MOOCs and means of accrediting learning on them such as certificates of completion for which there is a fee and open badges. We will also consider whether we might see MOOCs accredited as part of health science/professions degrees or for CME? Finally the session will discuss whether MOOC type approaches might offer new opportunities to innovate in teaching and learning that also support inter-professional learning and help our students to develop skills for lifelong learning.

bulletDownload the Presentation Slides Here

bulletDownload the Presentation Handout Here

bulletDetails about the Reconnect Learning Open badges Summit Here

bulletFurther information about open badges Here

 


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